TRANSITION FROM FOSSIL FUELS TO RENEWABLE ENERGY IN UZBEKISTAN

Authors

  • Akmal Rustamov Yeoju Technical Institute in Tashkent
  • Q.A. Sharipov Tashkent Institute of Economics

Abstract

The viewpoint of Uzbekistan's energy system is examined in this thesis. The current statistics on the Uzbek energy system is complicated since some people simply include power generation, while others examine transportation, home resources, district heating, and the energy resources utilized to deliver these goods. Another impediment to studying the Uzbek energy system is the always-positive perspective of past studies. Neither the system's decision-makers nor scientists examine present situations with a critical eye. Indicators are inflated to state-by-state proportions, and events are explained solely from a positive perspective; yet, there is very little opportunity for positives when contrasted to negatives. Uzbekistan is a country that is energy self-sufficient and has a good overall energy balance. After the breakup of the Soviet Union, Uzbekistan was the only country to increase natural gas output by 35 percent. The temporal span of proved reserves is estimated to range
from 35 to 55 years in the most optimistic scenario. Other fossil fuels have a lower part of the market, with 7 and 8% for oil and coal, respectively. Oil output is expected to fall somewhat, while coal production is expected to improve slightly. Hydropower
generation has hit its peak and is unlikely to grow much. In Uzbekistan, nuclear energy is not used. In the next fifty years, it is expected to be Uzbekistan's primary source of energy. Fossil fuels will run out in less than fifty years due to significant
growth in production and net exports.

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Published

2022-05-30